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Only a few decades ago the fact that cars could have accidents and possbly be the cause of deaths due to their designs were almost kept quiet by manufacturers. Now that there is more freedom of, and demand for, information by the consumer, the facts have to be scrutinised by the manufacturers and used to make the cars safer. So much so that on today's congested roads, safety features sell more cars than ever before and manufactureres are eager to point out cars' safety features to potential customers.
Manufacturers are required by law to reach a minimum standard of safety with each model they produce. NCAP testing encourages the manufacturers to exceed these minimums by comparing different models performances in independent accident tests.

NCAP Testing (est, 1997)
The aim of the Euro NCAP crash test program is twofold. There is a need for objective consumer information, but there is also a need to promote an industry when an effort is made to improve their vehicles beyond the demands of legislation. Crash testing is a way to get an early indication of the safety level of new cars. Euro NCAP uses stars to indicate the safety level of a vehicle. A combined star rating shows the protection level in the front collision and side collision together. The star scoring is based on point scores for the front and side. Maximum 34 points can be achieved by adding 16 front and 18 side points. The intention of the scores is to give an indication to what extent best practice or benchmarking has been applied to an individual car model, and not to predict the real-life outcome of a collision.

The tests are split into 5 categories:
Front Impact, - conducted at 64km/h (40mph) into an offset deformable barrier
Side Impact - conducted at 50km/h (approx. 30mph)
Pole Test - conducted at 25km/h (18mph)
Pedestrian Impact - conducted at 40km/h (25mph)
Head Protection.

Test results from Euro NCAP (24-08-11)

Test results from Euro NCAP (26-08-09)

Test results from Euro NCAP (18-02-09)

Test results from Euro NCAP (15-01-09)

Test results from Euro NCAP (26-11-08)

Test results from Euro NCAP (05-11-08)

Test results from Euro NCAP (27-08-08)

Test results from Euro NCAP (28-06-08)

Test results from Euro NCAP (14-03-08)

Test results from Euro NCAP (19-12-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (26-09-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (25-07-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (27-06-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (23-05-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (23-03-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (28-02-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (31-01-07)

Test results from Euro NCAP (22-12-06)

Test results from Euro NCAP (30-11-06)

Test results from Euro NCAP (28-04-06)

Test results from Euro NCAP (23-11-05)

Test results from Euro NCAP (28-06-05)

Test results from Euro NCAP (25-11-04)

Test results from Euro NCAP (04-10-04)

Test results from Euro NCAP (27-11-01)

First rear impact test: 80% of seats tested need improvement

ESC one year on: Carmakers still slipping on standard fit

Euro NCAP For Safer Cars

Euro NCAP disappointed at ESC fitment survey results

Euro NCAP spots weaknesses in two best-selling cars

Euro NCAP Announces It's Next Secretary General

Car Safety Timeline

Skill with responsibility.
Amongst other things the risk of an accident is influenced by road conditions, traffic conditions and the degree of concentration being applied. Keep a 'cocoon' of space around the car at all times.

Especially in front.
Stopping Distances
20 mph
12 m
40 ft
30 mph
23 m
75 ft
40 mph
36 m
120 ft
50 mph
53 m
175 ft
60 mph
73 m
240 ft
70 mph
96 m
315 ft
80 mph
144 m
480 ft
90 mph
183 m
595 ft
100 mph
212 m
700 ft
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